JESUS WEPT

Almost everyone has heard that John 11:35 is the shortest verse in the Bible and many have explained it, but as you know I usually have a slightly different view and this is no exception.

Most say that Jesus wept over Israel and I would agree that it was part of the reason. However, I think there was more to it.

When everyone else is crying it is very easy to be caught up in all of the sadness and Jesus was no exception, as He was man as well as God.

Jesus was sad because Mary was weeping and He knew that she was upset because her brother had died. Then many, if not most, of those who were following Mary were lost and would not turn to God; even though Jesus was going to die for them. This must have greatly saddened Jesus, as there was nothing more that He could do for them.

Imagine how Jesus must have felt when He considered this. If I were Jesus I would have just got mad at them, but Jesus is like our Father and is so full of love that there is no room for hate in His mind.

There is one thing that I see that others have not mentioned. Perhaps it is common knowledge and I just missed it, but just in case it not common knowledge. I will try to explain it.

We look at the miracle of the resurrection of Lazarus as a wonderful thing and it was, when viewed from the lesson that was taught by it. However, let us view it from a different angle.

Lazarus had died. He had gone through the agony of death and was safe from the world. Jesus was about to raise him from the grave and place him right back into the world, where he was again in danger of Satan.

Then there were the chief priests and the Pharisees.
(John 12:9-11 NIV) “Meanwhile a large crowd of Jews found out that Jesus was there and came, not only because of him but also to see Lazarus, whom he had raised from the dead. So the chief priests made plans to kill Lazarus as well, for on account of him many of the Jews were going over to Jesus and putting their faith in him.”

The method of operation of the Pharisees was to convince the Romans the person, that they wanted murdered, was a criminal and then, when they were convinced, the Romans would execute the person by crucifixion. .

Imagine that you are Jesus. You are about to raise someone that you love, from the depth of safety, placing that person in great danger, facing the same kind of death on the cross as you face. And for what? Even though both will die, only a few will understand and turn to our Father!

No wonder Jesus wept.

4 Responses to JESUS WEPT

  1. Kay says:

    Copied from gotquestions..org
    The term “Abraham’s bosom” is found only once in the New Testament, in the story of the rich man and Lazarus (Luke 16:19-31), in which Jesus was teaching about was the reality of heaven and hell. “Abraham’s bosom” in this story is also translated “Abraham’s side” (NIV, ESV), “next to Abraham” (CEV), “with Abraham” (NLT), and “the arms of Abraham” (NCV). These various translations speak to the enigmatic nature of the Greek word kolpos.

    All these translations are attempting to convey the sense that Lazarus went to a place of rest, contentment, and peace, almost as though Abraham (a highly revered person in Jewish history) was the protector or patron. In a sad contrast, the rich man finds himself in torment with no one to help, assist or console him. 

    Contrary to some contemporary thought, the Bible does teach that both heaven and hell are real places. Each person who lives will spend eternity in one of these two places. These two destinies are portrayed in Jesus’ story. While the rich man had lived for the day and only focused on life here on earth, Lazarus endured many hardships while trusting in God. So, verses 22 and 23 are significant: “So it was that the beggar died, and was carried by the angels to Abraham’s bosom. The rich man also died and was buried. And being in torments in Hades, he lifted up his eyes and saw Abraham afar off, and Lazarus in his bosom.”

    Death can be thought of as separation. Physical death is the separation of our body from our soul/spirit, while spiritual death is the separation of our soul from God. Jesus taught that we ought not to fear physical death, but we should be most concerned about spiritual death. As we read in Luke 12:4-5, Jesus also said, “And I say to you, My friends, do not be afraid of those who kill the body, and after that have no more that they can do. But I will show you whom you should fear: Fear Him who, after He has killed, has power to cast into hell; yes, I say to you, fear Him!” Jesus’ use of the term “Abraham’s bosom” was a part of His teaching to focus the minds of His hearers on the fact that our choices to seek God or disregard Him here on earth literally affect where we spend eternity.

    I share this because I believe that this was told to the disciples before Jesus was called to go to Lazarus. And to rise Lazarus was a purpose for the benefit of the rich man in hell. The rich man asked Abraham to send one as Lazarus back to tell his brothers so they do not end up like him. However as Abraham said they wouldn’t listen to the prophet’s they well not hear even from Lazarus.
    I believe it is no coincidence that the rising of Lazarus coincides with these writings.
    Many times God will give what is asked of him and if to only prove to man, He will let something happen to prove beyond any doubt that God has tried everything to prove Himself worthy.
    Unfortunately the Holy Bible doesn’t tell us what happen after Jesus rose Lazarus. Did Lazarus go to the brothers of the lost man in hell? I believe he did and I think Jesus cried for He knew that the brothers of the lost man would most likely kill Lazarus. This soon Jesus would be having to face as well.
    Brings to mind the many fields that need to be worked and when Jesus calls for one to work the field how many are willing to leave Abraham’s bosom?
    Just thoughts but is interesting to think that God is willing to ask His servants to leave safety to reach out yet again. What love to send Jesus God must have for man.

  2. S Ellsworth says:

    I believe Jesus cried for all lost souls – past, present, and future.

  3. astudent says:

    Kay,

    Well said

  4. astudent says:

    S Ellsworth,

    I agree. Also well said.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: